Tag Archives: Culture of Iran

#Iran: New Bill to Protect Children Allows Men to Marry Adopted 13-Year-Old Daughters

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"If only I was a Muslim."

“If only I was a Muslim.”

Sometimes it seems like there isn’t much morality in Islamic morality. But we have to respect different cultures and different points of view. Even when they’re marrying their adopted 13-year-old daughters.

Parliamentarians in Iran have passed a bill to protect the rights of children which includes a clause that allows a man to marry his adopted daughter and while she is as young as 13 years.

Shadi Sadr, a human rights lawyer with the London-based group Justice for Iran, told the Guardian she feared the council would feel safe to put its stamp of approval on the bill while Iran’s moderate president, Hassan Rouhani, draws the attention of the press during his UN visit to New York.

“This bill is legalising paedophilia,” she warned. “It’s not part of the Iranian culture to marry your adopted child. Obviously incest exists in Iran more or less as it happens in other countries across the world, but this bill is legalising paedophilia and is endangering our children and normalising this crime in our culture.”

She added: “You should not be able to marry your adopted children, full stop. If a father marries his adopted daughter who is a minor and has sex, that’s rape.”

That’s okay. The media will just explain that ones marrying their 13-year-old daughters are the moderates. The extremists marry 10-year-olds.

As many as 42,000 children aged between 10 and 14 were married in 2010, according to the Iranian news website Tabnak. At least 75 children under the age of 10 were wed in Tehran alone.

But… wait this all has a perfectly sensible reason.

According to Sadr, officials in Iran have tried to play down the sexual part of such marriages, saying it is in the bill to solve the issue of hijab [head scarf] complications when a child is adopted.

An adopted daughter is expected to wear the hijab in front of her father, and a mother should wear it in front of her adopted son if he is old enough, Sadr said.

It would be immoral for her not to wear a hijab in front of her adopted father. Let’s marry her off to him instead.

Iran ran into this problem when it tried to use temporary marriage to deal with the problem of co-ed classes in universities because that would allow men and women to work together in close quarters while technically being married.

A similar problem in Saudi Arabia led to the infamous breastfeeding Fatwa.

Back in May 2007, Dr. Izzat Atiya, head of Al Azhar University’s Department of Hadith, issued a fatwa, or Islamic legal decree, saying that female workers should “breastfeed” their male co-workers in order to work in each other’s company.

“A woman at work can take off the veil or reveal her hair in front of someone whom she breastfed.”

Islamic morality. It’s morality as designed by crazy perverts.

Iran launches YouTube-like video content site

By: //YouTube has a new competitor, with the government of Iran launching their Mehr.ir website, a user-generated video content site just like Google’s mammoth YouTube.

 

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Mehr.ir has a goal of spreading the influence of Islamic and Iranian culture throughout the Persian-speaking world. The Iranian government, until now, has spent years blocking most of their population from YouTube videos – so Mehr.ir is a step in a new direction.

 

Iran have expressed intent to create a closed-off Internet network, which would see international access severed – including huge services like Gmail and Google search. Iran hopes that the Mehr network will contain no anti-Islamic videos, such as the anti-Mohammed video that sparked conflict from the American filmmaker a couple of months ago.

Iran planning to cut internet access to rest of world

Iranians are already used to censors blocking Facebook, Gmail and foreign news sites, and being spied on with surveillance software purchased from Western companies.

But the ambitious plans would go much further, blocking access to foreign-based social media sites and email. Instead, there will be an Iranian version of Facebook and a new email service, to be called Iran Mail. Users will have to register their home address and social security number with police.

The plans have received the backing of the Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, the most powerful man in Iran, who has denounced the internet as sinful and a means for the West to wage “soft war” by invading Iranian culture.

But his real target is anti-regime activists who have relied on the internet since the failure of the “Green Revolution” which followed the disputed 2009 election. Since then security has been so tight on Iran’s streets that protests are broken up almost as soon as they start.

When the system, called Halal internet or National Internet by the regime, is introduced this summer only a few approved and carefully monitored businesses and government departments will have access to the World Wide Web. In effect Iran will have a giant, country-wide intranet, with cyber police blocking websites that are not approved.

The Iranian regime has been badly shaken by the use made of the internet by its own opponents and then by revolutionaries during the Arab Spring last year.

In particular mobile phone footage of a young woman called Neda Agha-Soltani, shot dead by government thugs in Tehran in 2009, spread rapidly on the internet, providing a powerful image to the world of the regime’s brutality.

Amir Bayani, of anti-censorship group Article 19, said: “The government doesn’t want video of another Neda going viral, so controlling the internet is a priority for them.

“People rely on the internet for information now. Nobody trusts official government news sources. The only uncensored information comes from blogs and Facebook, and that is under threat.

“Businesses are worried the new system may hurt their profits, and I can only hope that their opposition will be enough to shelve these plans.”By